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dc.contributor.authorKabak, Murat
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-07T08:50:03Z
dc.date.available2021-06-07T08:50:03Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier7tr
dc.identifier.issn2367-5705
dc.identifier.issn2367-8704
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11413/6372
dc.description.abstractWhile there are major works tracing the themes of belonging and longing for home in contemporary fiction, there is no current study adequately addressing the connection between dystopian novel and nostalgia. This paper aims to illustrate how the Canadian writer Margaret Atwood uses nostalgia as a framework to level a critique against technological utopianism in her dystopian novel Oryx and Crake (2003). The first novel in Atwood’s “MaddAddam Trilogy” problematizes utopian thought by focusing on the tension between two utopian projects: the elimination of all suffering and the perfection of human beings by discarding their weaknesses. Despite the claims of scientific objectivity and environmentalism, the novel exposes the religious and human-centered origins of Crake’s technological utopian project. Atwood’s Oryx and Crake is an ambiguous work of science fiction that combines utopian and dystopian elements into its narrative to criticize utopian thought.
dc.language.isoen_UStr
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesstr
dc.subjectDystopian fiction
dc.subjectMargaret Atwood
dc.subjectNostalgia
dc.subjectOryx and Crake
dc.subjectTechnological utopianism
dc.subjectDistopik kurgu
dc.subjectNostalji
dc.subjectTeknolojik ütopyacılık
dc.subjectOryx ve Crake
dc.titleMargaret Atwood’s “Oryx and Crake” as a Critique of Technological Utopianism
dc.typeArticletr
dc.relation.journalEnglish Studies at NBUtr
local.journal.issue1tr
local.journal.startpage37tr
local.journal.endpage50tr


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