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dc.contributor.authorYener, Görsev
dc.contributor.authorEmek Savaş, Derya Durusu
dc.contributor.authorGüntekin, Bahar
dc.contributor.authorBaşar, Erol
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-26T08:41:12Z
dc.date.available2018-07-26T08:41:12Z
dc.date.issued2014-10-17
dc.identifier.issn0006-8993
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2014.08.038
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11413/2362
dc.description.abstractMild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is considered in many as prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Event-related oscillations (ERO) reflect cognitive responses of brain whereas sensory-evoked oscillations (SE) inform about sensory responses. For this study, we compared visual SEO and ERO responses in MCI to explore brain dynamics (Background). Forty-three patients with MCI (mean age=74.0 year) and 41 age- and education-matched healthy-elderly controls (HC) (mean age=71.1 year) participated in the study. The maximum peak-to-peak amplitudes for each subject's averaged delta response (0.5-3.0 Hz) were measured from two conditions (simple visual stimulation and classical visual oddball paradigm target stimulation) (Method). Overall, amplitudes of target ERO responses were higher than SEO amplitudes. The preferential location for maximum amplitude values was frontal lobe for ERO and occipital lobe for SEO. The ANOVA for delta responses showed significant results for the group Xparadigm. Post-hoc tests indicated that (1) the difference between groups were significant for target delta responses, but not for SEO, (2) ERO elicited higher responses for HC than MCI patients, and (3) females had higher target ERO than males and this difference was pronounced in the control group (Results). Overall, cognitive responses display almost double the amplitudes of sensory responses over frontal regions. The topography of oscillatory responses differs depending on stimuli: visualsensory responses are highest over occipitals and -cognitive responses over frontal regions. A group effect is observed in MCI indicating that visual sensory and cognitive circuits behave differently indicating preserved visual sensory responses, but decreased cognitive responses (Conclusion). (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.tr_TR
dc.language.isoen_UStr_TR
dc.publisherElsevier Science Bv, Po Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlandstr_TR
dc.relationBrain Researchtr_TR
dc.subjectOscillationstr_TR
dc.subjectEvent-relatedtr_TR
dc.subjectMild cognitive impairmenttr_TR
dc.subjectMCItr_TR
dc.subjectAlzheimertr_TR
dc.subjectP300tr_TR
dc.subjectDementiatr_TR
dc.subjectEvent-Related Oscillationstr_TR
dc.subjectAlzheimers-Diseasetr_TR
dc.subjectDeltatr_TR
dc.subjectBiomarkerstr_TR
dc.subjectScaletr_TR
dc.subjectThetatr_TR
dc.subjectEegtr_TR
dc.subjectElectroencephalographytr_TR
dc.subjectPotentialstr_TR
dc.subjectDiagnosistr_TR
dc.titleThe visual cognitive network, but not the visual sensory network, is affected in amnestic mild cognitive impairment: A study of brain oscillatory responsestr_TR
dc.typeArticletr_TR
dc.contributor.authorID143760tr_TR
dc.contributor.authorID227002tr_TR
dc.contributor.authorID204666tr_TR
dc.contributor.authorID142226tr_TR


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