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dc.contributor.authorTan, Devran
dc.contributor.authorÖzerdem, Ayşegül
dc.contributor.authorGüntekin, Bahar
dc.contributor.authorAtagün, Murat İlhan
dc.contributor.authorTülay, Elif
dc.contributor.authorKaradağ, Figen
dc.contributor.authorBaşar, Erol
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-18T14:17:12Z
dc.date.available2018-07-18T14:17:12Z
dc.date.issued2016-04
dc.identifier.issn1550-0594
dc.identifier.other2169-5202
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1177/1550059414561056
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11413/2190
dc.description.abstractThe effect of lithium on neurocognition is not still fully explored. Brain oscillatory activity is altered in bipolar disorder. We aimed to assess the oscillatory responses of euthymic bipolar patients and how they are affected by lithium monotherapy. Event-related oscillations in response to visual target stimulus during an oddball paradigm in 16 euthymic drug-free and 13 euthymic lithium-treated bipolar patients were compared with 16 healthy controls. The maximum peak-to-peak amplitudes were measured for each subject's averaged beta (15-30 Hz) responses in the 0- to 300-ms time window over frontal (F3, Fz, F4), central (C3, Cz, C4), temporal (T7, T8), temporo-parietal (TP7, TP8), parietal (P3, Pz, P4), and occipital (O1, Oz, O2) areas. Patients under lithium monotherapy had significantly higher beta responses to visual target stimuli than healthy controls (P = .017) and drug-free patients (P = .015). The increase in beta response was observed at all electrode locations, however, the difference was statistically significant for the left (T7; P = .016) and right (T8; P = .031) temporal beta responses. Increased beta responses in drug-free patients and further significant increase in lithium-treated patients may be indicative of a core pathophysiological process of bipolar disorder and how it is affected by lithium. Whether the finding corresponds to lithium's corrective effect on the underlying pathology or to its neurocognitive side effect remains to be further explored. In either case, the finding is a sign that the oscillatory activity may be useful in tracking medication effect in bipolar disorder.tr_TR
dc.language.isoen_UStr_TR
dc.publisherSage Publications Inc, 2455 Teller Rd, Thousand Oaks, Ca 91320 USAtr_TR
dc.relationClinical EEG and Neurosciencetr_TR
dc.subjectbipolar disordertr_TR
dc.subjecteuthymiatr_TR
dc.subjectlithiumtr_TR
dc.subjectbrain oscillationstr_TR
dc.subjectbeta responsetr_TR
dc.subjectEvent-Related Potentialstr_TR
dc.subjectQuality-of-Lifetr_TR
dc.subjectAffective-Disordertr_TR
dc.subjectNeuropsychological Performancetr_TR
dc.subjectCognitive Performancetr_TR
dc.subjectUnaffected Relativestr_TR
dc.subjectVolume Increasetr_TR
dc.subjectFunctional Mritr_TR
dc.subjectAuditory P300tr_TR
dc.subjectManic Episodetr_TR
dc.titleIncreased Beta Frequency (15-30 Hz) Oscillatory Responses in Euthymic Bipolar Patients Under Lithium Monotherapytr_TR
dc.typeArticletr_TR
dc.contributor.authorID103606tr_TR
dc.contributor.authorID140995tr_TR
dc.contributor.authorID204666tr_TR
dc.contributor.authorID25145tr_TR
dc.contributor.authorID111061tr_TR
dc.contributor.authorID142226tr_TR


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